GBP/USD Live Chart

The British Pound is the currency of United Kingdom. GBPUSD, often referred to as The Cable, a foreign exchange term used to describe the British pound vs the US dollar, is one of the oldest traded currency pairs. In July of 1866, after an earlier failed attempt, the first reliable exchange rate between the British pound and the US dollar was transmitted between the London and New York Exchanges.

GBP/USD is the forex ticker that shows the value of the British Pound against the US Dollar. It tells traders how many US Dollars are needed to buy a British Pound. The Pound-Dollar is one of the oldest and most widely traded currency pairs in the world. Follow the live GBP/USD rate with the chart and keep up to date with Pound-Dollar news and analysis. Plan your trades with the GBP/USD forecast and key pivot points data and support and resistance levels.

Currency Facts

The United Kingdom’s central bank is the Bank of England. As the fourth most traded currency, the British Pound is the third most held reserve currency in the world. Common names for the British Pound include the Pound Sterling, Sterling, Quid, Cable, and Nicker.

  • Name: British Pound
  • Symbol: £ penny: p
  • Minor Unit: 1/100 = penny
  • Central Bank Rate: 0.75
  • Inflation: 2.70%
  • Nicknames: Pound Sterling, Sterling, Quid, Nicker
  • Coins: Freq Used: £1, £2, 1p, 2p, 5p, 10p, 20p, 50p
  • Banknotes: Freq Used: £5, £10, £20, £50, Rarely Used: £100
  • Central Bank: Bank of England, Website: bankofengland.co.uk

Importance of the British Pound

The British Pound is the oldest currency still in use today, as well as one of the most commonly converted currencies. The Falkland Islands, Gibraltar, and Saint Helena are all pegged at par to the GBP.

The British Pound and the Sterling Area

The British Pound was not only used in Great Britain, but also circulated through the colonies of the British Empire. The countries that used the Pound became to be known as the Sterling Area and the Pound grew to be globally popular, held as a reserve currency in many central banks. However, as the British economy started to decline the US Dollar grew in dominance. In 1940, the Pound was pegged to the US Dollar at a rate of 1 Pound to $4.03 US Dollars and many other countries followed, by pegging their respective currencies. In 1949, the Pound was devalued by 30% and a second devaluation followed in 1967. When the British Pound was decimalized and began to float freely in the market, in 1971, the Sterling Area was terminated. Following, the British Pound experienced a number of highs and lows.